False motor injury claims affect all vehicle owners as they add significant costs to the CTP Scheme.

People who stage accidents, intentionally misrepresent facts, provide false documents, exaggerate their injuries or losses, or make dishonest statements to obtain financial gain are committing fraud (deception).

The deception may involve a claimant, vehicle owner, service provider or another individual or organisation.

Some examples of deception include a person who may be in involved in a motor vehicle accident, lodges a CTP claim and:

  • deceptively says they have injuries which significantly affect their mobility, however regularly participates in contact sport and other active duties around the home or at work
  • exaggerates the income received prior to the accident, which is used to calculate their economic loss
  • falsely states that injuries they sustained before their motor vehicle accident were solely due to the accident.

The Regulator and CTP insurers are committed to preventing deception. If an insurer suspects or detects dishonest conduct, this may be referred for criminal investigation.

If you suspect someone is being deceptive about a CTP claim, report it to the Regulator:

You can remain anonymous if you wish.

Car crash scamming

Car crash scammers (also known as ‘claim farmers’ in the insurance industry) contact people who they think have been involved in a motor vehicle accident.

Scammers pretend to help you to make a CTP insurance claim. They encourage you to provide your personal details so they can sell these to lawyers to make money for themselves. This is illegal.

If you are tricked by a scammer into lodging a false claim, this could leave you with large legal and treatment bills to pay.

Car crash scamming also has a negative impact on motorists and the CTP Scheme.

Car crash scammers can be very sophisticated and convincing.

If you are contacted, do not provide any personal details.

Report car crash scammers to the Regulator:

You can remain anonymous if you wish.